Seaweed found to stop methane emissions from cattle rumen

Exposing the Big Game

By Thomas Hubert on 17 July 2017
  • Further research must now confirm in vitro findings in live animals.
    Further research must now confirm in vitro findings in live animals.

Successive in vitro studies have shown up to 100% reduction in the emissions of the potent greenhouse gas from grass digestion.

new study by Australian-based researchers shows that adding freeze-dried Asparagopsis taxiformis to test tubes replicating the fermentation process at work in a ruminant’s gut “completely inhibited the production of CH4” (methane).

The study led by James Cook University academic Matthew Vucko looked into various post-harvest treatments of the tropical red algae and found that “frozen and subsequently freeze-dried was the most effective processing method to maintain antimethanogenic activity”. It links the methane-inhibiting effect of the seaweed to the presence of the chemical compound bromoform.

Seaweed not only helped improve the cows’ health and growth, but also reduced their methane production

It builds upon research published last year, in which…

View original post 284 more words

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